Despite Irma, Corn Belt will stay dry for the next several days

Despite Irma, Corn Belt will stay dry for the next several days

Eric Snodgrass
Principal Atmospheric Scientist

The last 36 hours of weather observations have allowed weather forecast models to hone in on Irma's eventual path through Florida. We expect a late Saturday landfall at Category 3+ intensity (likely Category 4-5 intensity) along the southern tip of Florida. Hurricane Irma, which is the size of Texas, will traverse the state from the south to the north, bringing hurricane force winds to the entire width of the peninsula.

Pocket Drone Control featured at 2017 Farm Progress Show

With many growers looking to quickly inspect and assess acres for crop damage, autonomous drone flights with immediate image processing will be the key. At this year’s Farm Progress Show in Decatur, Illinois, attendees will get hands-on experience with the Pocket Drone Control™ app, powered by Agrible®. 

Cooler and drier weather for the Corn Belt, potential flooding for Texas and Mississippi

Cooler and drier weather for the Corn Belt, potential flooding  for Texas and Mississippi

Eric Snodgrass
Senior Atmospheric Scientist

As forecast in our early Monday update, beneficial rains fell across a large section of the Corn Belt over the last 24 hours. While the clouds did obscure the view for many during the eclipse, the rains will go a long way to help the corn and soybean crops finish well.

Workshops, weather, and what’s coming up with Eric Snodgrass.

Workshops, weather, and what’s coming up with Eric Snodgrass.

Given Eric Snodgrass’ extensive experience as a global weather expert, he was a perfect fit to speak at the recent InfoAg conference. As Principal Atmospheric Scientist at Agrible, Eric provides weather forecast solutions for global agriculture, which give ag users insights to make operational decisions weeks in advance. Eric held a workshop called, “Weather Data & Tools, Growing Season Weather Risks in Agriculture.” We wanted to hear more about this workshop and sat down with Eric to hear his thoughts.

Agrible’s CEO, Chris Harbourt, talks tech and its impact on the ag industry

Agrible’s CEO, Chris Harbourt, led a breakout session at the 2017 Illinois Farm Bureau Farm Income and Innovations Conference. The conference took a deep look into how changing consumer desires, supply chain management, and public policies are impacting agriculture. Harbourt’s session, Decoding the World of Ag Technology: How to Succeed at Farming for the Future, discussed how technology is changing the agriculture industry.

We sat down with Harbourt to discuss his session and the importance of the issues shared at the conference. 

What did you talk about during your session?

Harbourt:
I focused on the AgTech landscape, the great companies out there, and gave examples of some of the companies I hope “make it”. There are some companies that work in key areas that have real impact on a grower's operation. I connected all of those items back to sustainability, the focus of Agrible, and the opportunity in Agrible sustainability programs for growers.


What were you most looking forward to at this conference?

Harbourt:
I’m happy anytime I get to talk to farmers, share a bit of knowledge, and listen to their thoughts. It’s the same things that are swirling around in my head all the time. I live this stuff, immersed in ag every day, all day and in my spare time. Every conversation, expression, laugh from the audience, and question helps me justify the focus and dedication to a great set of customers.


Why are these issues important to discuss?

Harbourt:
Sustainability is important to discuss with growers because we live in a time where consumer pressure, social networks, forward-thinking food companies, and a focus on nutrition are all creating an opportunity for farmers. Farmers can show the world how good of a job we all do growing the grain, and how a sustainable crop is worth more in the marketplace as a result.


How is Agrible helping to solve the challenges that you are speaking about?

Harbourt:
Agrible is exactly what the supply chain needed, at exactly the right time. We connect the stories of how food ingredients are grown through the products we buy in a way that creates a connection for consumers back to the earth.
 

Agrible co-founder selected as finalist for state-wide Technologist of the Year award

Agrible co-founder selected as finalist for state-wide Technologist of the Year award

Agrible’s Chief Science Officer, Paul Miller, is a finalist for the 2017 ITA CityLIGHTS, Technologist of the Year Award. The state-wide award is presented to the individual whose talent has championed true innovation, either through new applications of existing technology, or the development of technology to achieve a truly unique product or service. 

Dry for the Corn Belt, potential flooding hazard from Central Plains through the Southeast.

Dry for the Corn Belt, potential flooding hazard from  Central Plains through the Southeast.

Eric Snodgrass
Senior Atmospheric Scientist

A large ridge over the western U.S. has introduced very hot temperatures to the West Coast and air quality is quite bad due to smoke from fires—especially in Washington. But, that same ridge is part of the overall flow pattern that has produced a trough for the central and eastern U.S.

Agrible® integrates with FieldWatch® to help growers see sensitive crops and make good spraying decisions

Jason Little
Director of Sales

Applying herbicides has become increasingly more complex over the last few years. New chemistries and genetics came with new label restrictions, and consumer demand has increased the number of organic, non-GMO, and specialty crop acres. Add in highly variable weather, and the logistical issues are quite clear.

Worried about dicamba? Agrible has the tool to help you spray responsibly.

Dave Pike, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist

It seems that every few years Midwest agriculture experiences crop injury resulting from misapplication of herbicides, as growers learn ways to adapt to the changes in technology. This year, numerous cotton fields across the South and soybean fields throughout the Midwest show evidence of dicamba injury.